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24.07.10

NEW ZEALAND. Visit of the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples' Rights, 18 to 23 July 2010

Dossier converge.org.nz

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous People, Professor James Anaya, is visiting Aotearoa New Zealand from 18 to 23 July 2010. He is here at the invitation of the government to follow up on the visit of the previous Special Rapporteur, Dr Rodolfo Stavenhagen, who came in 2005 to assess the human rights situation of Maori following the enactment of the foreshore and seabed legislation.

Please scroll down this page for information and media releases about the visit; as well as background information on United Nations Special Rapporteurs, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples' Rights, visits by United Nations Special Procedures, and links to recent reports by other UN human rights bodies which comment on the New Zealand government's performance in relation to indigenous peoples' rights and the foreshore and seabed legislation.

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NEW ZEALAND. James Anaya: More to be done to improve indigenous people’s rights, says UN Expert

 

Auckland, 23 July 2010
The UN Special Rapporteur on indigenous people, James Anaya, called on the New Zealand Government to keep on moving forward to find adequate solutions to the challenges still faced by the Maori population.

"I have observed several positive aspects of New Zealand’s legal and policy landscape, as well as ongoing challenges, in relation to Maori issues", Mr. Anaya said at the end of a follow-up visit to the country to monitor issues related to human rights of the Maori, including strategies to reduce inequalities between Maori and non-Maori.

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23.07.10

Relator James Anaya: New Zealand must forge ahead with efforts to improve indigenous people’s rights



23 July 2010 – As “troubling” inequalities persist between Maori and non-Maori, New Zealand must press ahead with efforts to improve the human rights of its indigenous people, a United Nations independent expert said today.

The country has made efforts to address ongoing challenges on the issue, but “I cannot help but note the extreme disadvantage in the social and economic conditions of Maori people, which are dramatically manifested in the continued and persistent high levels of incarceration of Maori individuals,” said James Anaya, UN Special Rapporteur on indigenous people, in a statement.


[Foto: banderas de ONU y New Zealand en frontis del Parlamento durante visita del Relator]

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22.07.10

NEW ZEALAND. UN hears concerns of Maori

Northland Maori have taken their concerns directly to the ears of the United Nations, thanks to a visit from the UN special rapporteur on indigenous rights.

The visit by James Anaya follows the Government's signing of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples earlier this year, and a similar visit five years ago which spawned a report criticising New Zealand's treatment of Maori - especially around the foreshore and seabed issue.

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NEW ZEALAND.Anaya: NZ moving in the right direction on race relations

 

21.07.2010. A UN human rights expert in New Zealand to assess the rights of Maori says New Zealand is making positive steps in the right direction.

 

James Anaya says Maori now need to take it upon themselves to improve their living conditions, but many Maori listening to him speak at Waitangi’s Te Tii marae say they are still the victims of racism in this country.

Nga Puhi welcomed UN special rapporteur Mr Anaya onto the marae. They especially welcomed the opportunity to discuss Maori issues.

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20.07.10

Special Rapporteur's visit time to drop charges

UN Special Rapporteurs visit is best time to drop the charges!

The visit of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the best opportunity for the National government to drop the charges against the 18 defendants in the Terror Raids case, said Peter Steiner, spokesperson for the October 15th Solidarity group.

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NEW ZEALAND. UN visitor checks NZ race relations

20.07.2010. The decision to deny Maori guaranteed representation on Auckland's Super City council may prove a blot on what the Prime Minister yesterday described as his Government's leading record on indigenous people's rights.

The visiting United Nations special rapporteur on indigenous human rights, James Anaya, yesterday began a week of meetings with Government ministers, Maori groups and others as he follows up on issues previously reported on by his predecessor, Rodolfo Stavenhagen.

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NEW ZEALAND. J. Anaya visits Waitangi marae


Professor James Anaya, a United Nations special rapporteur, has visited the marae at Waitangi where a few hundred people turned out to voice their concerns about the status of Maori in New Zealand.

Mr Anaya says his role is to review the issues raised by his predecessor Rodolfo Stavenhagen.

Five years ago, Mr Stavenhagen delivered a report critical of the government, which among other things called for the Foreshore and Seabed Act to be repealed.

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19.07.10

NEW ZEALAND. UN Special Rapporteur talks with Finlayson

19 July 2010. Treaty settlements and the foreshore and seabed review were two of the topics for discussion when the Attorney-General met the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Monday.

Attorney-General Chris Finlayson says he gave Professor James Anaya, who is on a week-long visit to New Zealand, an overview of the Government's plans to repeal the Foreshore and Seabed Act.

Mr Finlayson says he welcomes the scrutiny from the UN.

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NEW ZEALAND. A public seminar with the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

The Maori Business Programme, Victoria Management School and the NZ Centre for Public Law, Victoria University of Wellington, in partnership with Peace Movement Aotearoa, invite you to:

A public seminar with the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

Monday, 19 July 2010, 5.30pm to 7pm
Lecture Theatre Two, Rutherford House
(Corner Bunny Street and Lambton Quay, Pipitea campus, Victoria University)

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17.07.10

NEW ZEDALAND. Welcome to the Special Rapporteur

17.07.2010. The Minister of M?ori Affairs, Dr Pita Sharples, is pleased to welcome United Nations Special Rapporteur, Professor James Anaya to New Zealand on behalf of the New Zealand Government.

Professor Anaya will be in New Zealand for a week, from 18 July to 23 July, to meet with Ministers, iwi and other interested parties to discuss human rights and indigenous development. Professor Anaya’s full title is United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous Peoples.

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16.07.10

UN expert on indigenous people in follow-up mission to New Zealand

GENEVA (16 July 2010) – The UN Special Rapporteur on indigenous people, James Anaya, will visit New Zealand from 18 to 23 July to gather information on developments concerning indigenous peoples in the country since the mission of his predecessor in 2005*, which focused on issues of self-governance and cultural identity of the Maori population, its property rights to land and coastal areas, as well as strategies to reduce inequalities between Maori and non-Maori.

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20.04.10

NZ. Editorial: Small step at UN is big on symbolic value

Categories: New Zealand

When the previous Labour Government was confronted with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, it quailed.

The potential political backlash, rather than the practical outcome of signing a non-binding document, was uppermost in its mind.

 


Pita Sharples (far right) said NZ's signature restored the mana and moral authority of Maori to speak in international forums on justice, rights and peace matters. Photo / Supplied

 

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NZ. Indigenous Declaration part of Nats’ clever game

Categories: New Zealand

What I think Pita Sharples fails to understand is that John Key and National don’t see international agreements the way the Left does.

The Maori Party is dead keen on the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples because they believe that by signing on the New Zealand government will be committing itself, legally and morally, to the principles contained within, including the implication that indigenous peoples have special rights, and that will have real-world effects for policy etc.

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NZ. UN Declaration Creates Two Countries - Peters

Categories: New Zealand

Signing a controversial United Nations declaration on indigenous rights is a huge mistake, according to Rt. Hon Winston Peters, who was Foreign Minister when New Zealand decided to reject the declaration.

Mr Peters said today he was shocked that National and the Maori party had secretly agreed to a deal to “throw away” New Zealand's sovereignty and create what amounted to another state within a state.

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NZ. Labour is accusing the government of making a secret deal with the Maori Party

Categories: New Zealand

Labour is accusing the government of making a secret deal with the Maori Party which it says is severely stressing National's relationship with its partners.

The row is over the government's decision to support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, announced in New York early on Tuesday by Maori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples without any advance notice of his trip.

The declaration sets out the rights of indigenous people, including ownership of land they have always occupied and protection of their language and culture.

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Amnesty Welcomes New Zealand Support For Indigenous Rights

Amnesty International Welcomes NZ’s Official Support For Indigenous Rights

Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand welcomes the New Zealand Government’s decision to endorse the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Amnesty International has campaigned vigorously for New Zealand to officially support the Declaration, which now reaffirms New Zealand’s commitment to advancing the human rights of Indigenous peoples.

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NEW ZEALAND. Sharples: Statement to UN on Indigenous Peoples

Categories: New Zealand

Mihi to United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Announcement of New Zealand’s Support for the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

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NEW ZEALAND. Maori Party: Declaration good for Maori, good for the nation

The Maori Party has welcomed the Government’s decision to adopt the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

“This is a proud moment for this Government and Aotearoa,” co-leader Tariana Turia said in response to this morning’s announcement in New York that the declaration, which sets a standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples, has been accepted without any caveats.

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NEW ZEALAND. PM 'naive in the extreme' over UN declaration - Hide

Categories: New Zealand

Act leader Rodney Hide says his party is "shocked and appalled" at the Government's decision to support the United Nations' Declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

In Parliament he described Prime Minister John Key as "naive in the extreme" that the Government's decision would have no practical effect.

He also criticised National for what he saw as a breach of the "no surprises" policy.

Maori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples flew to New York without publicly revealing he was to make a speech announcing New Zealand would sign up to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

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NEW ZEALAND. Primer Minister: UN declaration will have no practical effect

Categories: New Zealand

A United Nations declaration on the rights of indigenous people that New Zealand signed up to overnight will have no practical effect, Prime Minister John Key says.

Maori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples flew to New York without publicly revealing he was to make a speech announcing New Zealand would sign up to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The previous Labour government had refused to sign, saying it was incompatible with New Zealand's constitution, legal framework and the Treaty of Waitangi.

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19.04.10

NEW ZEALAND. Nats give in to Maori over rights declaration

Categories: New Zealand

National has bowed to Maori Party wishes and agreed to support the highly contentious United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples despite the previous Labour Government issuing dire warnings that the document is fundamentally incompatible with New Zealand's constitutional and legal systems.

New Zealand's support for the declaration was conveyed in a speech early today by Maori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples at the United Nations in New York.

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09.04.10

An Indigenous Perspective on the Standardisation of Restorative Justice in New Zealand and Canada

Categories: Australia, New Zealand

By: Juan Marcellus Tauri | Vol. XX, No. 3 (Fall 2009) | Uploaded 04 marzo 2010

Introduction

The development and implementation of restorative justice policies and initiatives has increased dramatically in western jurisdictions, including New Zealand and Canada, since the early 1990s (Jantzi, 2001). This rise in activity has instigated a drive by state officials, supported by some practitioners, to standardise the design and delivery of restorative justice initiatives (Cormier, 2002; Ministry of Justice, 2007; Roach, 2000).

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04.04.10

New Zealand. Reviewing the Foreshore and Seabed Act 2004

The government is seeking feedback from the public on a consultation document released today setting out options for a possible replacement of the Foreshore and Seabed Act, and outlining the government's proposal, Attorney-General Chris Finlayson said.

"This is the latest stage of public consultation in developing a solution for the foreshore and seabed issue that recognizes and protects the interests of all New Zealanders," Mr Finlayson said.  "We are very interested in hearing New Zealanders' views. They matter."

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03.04.10

New Zealand finds answer to Maori rights dispute

April 01, 2010. WELLINGTON: New Zealand has found a new way to end a bitter dispute over the ownership of the country's beaches and shores by declaring that no one owns them, but everyone can use them.

Attorney-General Chris Finlayson said yesterday the government would propose legislation to end the dispute over whether the country's 18 700km coast belongs to the country's indigenous Maori minority or the entire population.

The move is aimed at replacing a contentious law that nationalised the seabed and shoreline in 2004.

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15.12.09

NEW ZELAND. Maori lay claim to radio spectrum

Three Maori groups have filed a claim at the Waitangi Tribunal to seek a share of radio spectrum worth more than $100 million that will be released by the Government following the closure of analogue television after 2013.

They sought an urgent hearing, saying the fate of the spectrum was to be decided at a Cabinet meeting yesterday.

The "digital dividend" spectrum is expected to be carved into at least two blocks, one suitable for digital television transmissions and another for "4G" cellular and other wireless broadband technologies.

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05.04.06

NEW ZEALAND. Response to UN Special Rapporteur report . Michael Cullen 4 April, 2006

Deputy Prime Minister Michael Cullen has described the final report of the UN Special Rapporteur for indigenous issues as disappointing, unbalanced and narrow.

"It's hardly surprising that Mr Stavenhagen has come to selective conclusions when he only spent about eight working days consulting in the country all up.

"As a result he has failed to grasp the importance of the special mechanisms we have in place to deal with Maori grievances and the progress successive governments have made," said Dr Cullen.

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