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29.04.10

In Resumed Organizational Session, Economic and Social Council Fills Vacancies in Subsidiary Bodies

Categories: Varios en ingles

Economic and Social Council

2010 Organizational Session

8th & 9th Meetings (AM & PM)

In a resumed organizational session today, the Economic and Social Council adopted three draft decisions and filled vacancies in 18 of its subsidiary bodies, with five requiring votes.

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16.04.10

NORWAY. Mining and Reindeer Can Mix?

Categories: Varios en ingles, Sapmi

A multi stakeholder seminar was held in the Kautokeino, Norway yesterday which focussed on the issue of mining in Finnmark, an issue of some controversy in the region since the passing of the Finnmark Act which devolved desicion making powers over multiple resource issues to the region of Finnmark.

The seminar was attended by the leader of the EALÁT project and several EALÁT partners including the leader of the Sami Reindeer Herders Association of Norway. Heavyweight politicians were present, including the Parliamentary leader of the governing Labour Party Helga Pedersen and the leader of the mining company Store Norske Gull, who have been active in staking claims  most particularly in the Karasjok region. Pedersen was unequivocal in her support for the future development of mining in the the region, which reindeer herders fear will mean the further erosion of winter pastures that are already under duress. Pedersen told NRK Sami Radio

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15.04.10

Indigenous Conference in Nordic Countries Opens with UN Expert Taking Part

ROVANIEMI, Finland -- A conference of indigenous representatives and State officials from all the European Nordic countries opened in Finland today with a United Nations expert focusing on issues ranging from the status of Sami self-determination to education and language.

The Sami of Northern Europe are the indigenous people in the northern regions of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. Demographic patterns make it difficult to give exact numbers but there are at least 40,000 in Norway, about 20,000 in Sweden, and just over 7,000 in Finland. Some 2,000 Sami live in the Russian Kola Peninsula.

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09.04.10

Música y derechos colectivos indígenas: Homenaje a Difang e Igay Duana / A Difang and Igay Duana tribute / (1921-2002)


En 1996, cuando el éxito musical Retorno a la inocencia retumbó en los campos olímpicos como tema de las Olímpiadas de Atlanta, casi nadie en los estrados sabía que las voces cautivadoras eran aquéllas de los indígenas ami de Taiwan.

La compañia EMI  y  el grupo Enigma fueron demandados por plagio y violación de los derechos colectivos de autor del pueblo Ami y de sus interpretes Difang y su esposa Igay.

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26.03.10

AFRICA. What is the Future of the Oromo People?

Categories: Varios en ingles

 

This excerpt is from the paper that Dr. Jalata presented at the 4th International Human Rights Conference organized by the Minnesota-based Oromo-American Citizens’ Council (OACC) in Minneapolis on March 13, 2010.

By Dr. Asafa Jalata*

The future of the Oromo people depends on what the Oromo liberation and political organizations and society will do to assure the survivability of the Oromo nation and its liberation from Ethiopian colonialism. The Oromo people have achieved what I have mentioned above by the determination and sacrifices of a few nationalist Oromos. Had millions of Oromos practically contributed their fare shares to the Oromo national movement, the level of the Oromo struggle would have been on the highest level or Oromia would have achieved its liberation. Furthermore, there are still millions of mercenary Oromos who are bleeding their nation by serving the enemies of the Oromo people. As I have already mentioned, some Oromo elites have promoted clan, regional or religious politics.

 


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CANADA. Number of kids with Type 2 diabetes rising, especially among aboriginals: report

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WINNIPEG - What used to be known as adult-onset diabetes is showing up in more and more children, especially among aboriginals, says a recent study by the Manitoba Institute of Child Health.

The study found 345 cases of Type 2 diabetes in children across Canada between April, 2006 and March, 2008. Almost half - 44 per cent - were kids with aboriginal heritage.

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Canada promises ‘qualified recognition’ of UN Declaration. Raises red flags.

Categories: Varios en ingles

Canada has promised to endorse the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but a Mohawk journalist and consultant cautions that there’s no reason to rejoice just yet. Kenneth Deer, a lifelong Mohawk resident of Kahnawake, said language like “qualified recognition,” “aspirational,” and “in a manner fully consistent with Canada’s Constitution and laws” raises red flags.


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Indigenous recognition (By Leeanne Root)

Categories: Varios en ingles, USA

Human rights initiatives, including the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, have avoided direct recognition of indigenous peoples. Human rights documents speak of individual rights and more recently, thanks to the Declaration, there are discussions of collective rights. There should be no mistake, the recent developments in international human rights are very important. The Declaration should be given credit for expanding the human rights initiative to include broader understanding of collective group human rights.

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CANADA. Coastal First Nations Oppose Canada Tar Sands Pipeline

Categories: Varios en ingles

The Coastal First Nations, a coalition of aboriginal communities in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest, publicly announced their strong opposition this week to the Northern Gateway pipeline, a project would would run tar sands oil from Alberta to a port near the Pacific Ocean.

Enbridge Inc.'s plan is to open export markets for tar sands oil outside the United States — notably China. However, the Coastal First Nations see the pipeline as a major threat to their territory and way of life.

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11.02.10

AFRICA. Landmark Decision for Indigenous Land Rights in Kenia

 

In a landmark decision this month, the African Union endorsed a 2009 ruling by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights which ordered the Kenyan government to restore the traditional land base of the Endorois People.

 

In May 2009, the Pan-African Commission found the government was guilty of violating the Endorois’ rights to property, health, culture, religion, and natural resources when, in 1973, they began to evict the population to make way for a national wildlife reserve and various tourist facilities. The eviction continued until 1986.

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AFRICA. Kenyan Government Ordered to Return Land to Indigenous People

For nearly three decades, about 60,000 Endorois, who used to earn their livelihoods from raising cattle and goats, have been forced to live in an arid, poverty-stricken area of Kenya, largely dependent on food aid.

Human rights activists are hailing a landmark ruling by a pan-African body as a major victory for indigenous people across Africa.  The ruling orders the Kenyan government to take steps to return land to a group of indigenous people forced out by the government in the 1970s from Lake Bogoria, one of the top tourist destinations in the country. 

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08.02.10

AUSTRALIA. Protesters in court for defending heritage

Categories: Varios en ingles

HOBART — A group of Aboriginal activists faced court on February 4 over a protest that halted work on the Brighton Bypass in November.

Michael Mansell, Jimmy Everett, Sarah Lesley Maynard and Maree Rose Maynard pleaded not guilty in Hobart Magistrates Court to trespassing and contravening the conditions of a notice.

Nineteen protesters were charged at the protest.

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AUSTRALIA. Aboriginal summit calls for new way

The New Way Summit on Aboriginal rights was held at the Australian National University, Canberra from January 30 to February 1. It was attended by 150 people, plus around 600 who hooked in via phone and internet links.

Convened by Michael Anderson, the sole survivor of the original group of men who founded the 1972 Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the summit called on Aboriginal leaders and communities to discuss a “new way” for the Aboriginal rights movement.

16.01.10

UN. The state of the world's indigenous peoples

Categories: Varios en ingles

15 January 2010This report on the state of the world’s indigenous peoples reveals alarming statistics on poverty, health, education, employment, human rights, the environment and more.

Indigenous peoples contribute extensibly to humanity's cultural diversity, enriching it with more than two thirds of its languages and an extrordinary amount of its traditional knowledge.

There are over 370 million indigenous people in some 90 countries, living in all regions of the world. The situation of indigenous peoples in many parts of the world is critical today. Poverty rates are significantly higher among indigenous peoples compared to other groups. While they constitute 5 per cent of the world's population, they are 15 per cent of the world's poor. Most indicators of well-being show that indigenous peoples suffer disproportinately compared to non-indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples face systemic discrimination and exclusion from political and economic power; they continue to be over-represented among the poorest, the illiterate, the destitute; they are displaced by wars and environmental disasters; indigenous peoples are dispossessed of their ancestral lands and deprived of their resources for survival, both physical and cultural; they are even robbed of their very right to life.

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06.11.09

EEUU. Pine Ridge: A housing issue

Categories: Varios en ingles

By Victoria Bomberry, Today correspondent

PINE RIDGE, S.D. – The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing Raquel Rolnik visited Pine Ridge Nov. 2 to investigate the housing conditions on the reservation.

Located in the poorest county in the United States, Pine Ridge provided Rolnik the opportunity to view housing conditions that reflect the problems present in Indian country throughout the United States. Pine Ridge is the only rural location on her tour of the United States. While Rolnik is responding to the nation-wide housing crisis, inadequate housing is a serious problem that plagues Indian communities in both rural and urban areas.

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President’s remarks and Q&A at Tribal Nations Conference

Categories: Varios en ingles, USA

By Department of Interior, Washington, D.C.

The president: Thank you. Please, everybody have a seat. Thank you to Jefferson Keel, thanks for the wonderful introduction; to Clarence Jackson for the invocation. Good morning to all of you. I am honored to be with you today at this unique and historic event, the largest and most widely attended gathering of tribal leaders in our history. (Applause.) And I am so grateful to many members of Congress who could join us today, along with several members of my Cabinet who will be participating in this conference today.

You know, a couple of summers ago, I had the opportunity to visit the Crow Nation in Montana. And while I was there, I was adopted into the nation by a wonderful couple, Hartford and Mary Black Eagle. I know what they’re saying now: “Kids grow up so fast.” (Laughter.) Only in America could the adoptive son of Crow Indians grow up to become President of the United States. (Applause.)

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Obama ushers in a new era for Indian country

Categories: Varios en ingles, USA

By Rob Capriccioso

WASHINGTON – Fulfilling a pledge to forge a strong and lasting partnership with tribal nations, the leader of the free world took some time out of his schedule to address a plethora of concerns affecting Native American people and their communities.

“I’m absolutely committed to moving forward with you and forging a new and better future together,” President Barack Obama said during a Nov. 5 speech to hundreds of tribal leaders gathered in Washington from sovereign nations across the country.

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03.07.09

AUSTRALIA. Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2009

Categorías: Varios en ingles

In April 2002, the Council of Australian Governments commissioned the Steering Committee to produce a regular report against key indicators of Indigenous disadvantage. This report has an important long-term objective. It is to inform Australian governments about whether policy programs and interventions are achieving positive outcomes for Indigenous people. This will help guide where further work is needed.

Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2009 was released on 2 July 2009.

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AUSTRALIA. Gap dividing Aborigines growing

Categorías: Varios en ingles

A national report on Aboriginal social and economic trends in Australia has shown their condition has deteriorated.

In particular it showed that the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous citizens has grown wider in areas like child abuse and domestic violence.

It revealed that Aboriginal children are six times as likely to be abused as non-indigenous children.

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CANADA. Aboriginal populations vulnerable to H1N1

Categorías: Varios en ingles

The author of a study to be published in the next issue of the medical journal Lancet said swine flu could devastate indigenous populations around the world due to their sensitivity to infectious disease.

Dr. Michael Gracey, a medical adviser to Unity of First People of Australia, an aboriginal non-profit organization, suggests that the world's almost 400 million indigenous peoples — including about 1.2 million in Canada — are particularly at risk for contracting swine flu because they often live in remote, impoverished communities with limited access to medical infrastructure.

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Poverty And Cultural Loss Are Some Of The Essential Causes Of The Health Gap Between Indigenous And Non-Indigenous People

Categorías: Varios en ingles

The second of two reviews in this week´s The Lancet discusses the primary origins of the health gap. In an effort to understand these inequalities, the authors attempt to give an Indigenous perspective. It is the work of Professor Malcolm King, of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and Scientific Director, Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health (Canadian Institutes of Health Research); Dr Alexandra Smith, of the University of Toronto, Canada; and Professor Michael Gracey, Unity of First People of Australia, Perth, Australia. In this review, the authors focus on North American Indigenous groups, although others are discussed.

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02.07.09

TAIWAN. Aborigines condemn CIP’s Pingpu snub

Categorías: Varios en ingles
Etiquetas:

NOT ABORIGINAL? : The Council of Indigenous Peoples said in a statement that the Pingpu had chosen assimilation with Han culture and never stood with their brothers

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Five Key Indigenous Peoples Issues for the Week of June 24 - 30, 2009

Categorías: Varios en ingles

Australia: Policy May Force Indigenous Communities From Traditional Lands

A government plan purporting to improve the lives of people living in isolated areas of Australia’s Northern Territory will be implemented at the expense of surrounding homeland communities and ignores the cultural and health benefits for people living on those traditional lands, warn critics.

The ‘Working Future’ scheme is headed by the proposal to develop 20 remote Northern Territory (NT) communities into regional hubs and will cost more than 160 million Australian dollars over five years.

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25.06.09

EEUU. Teehee announced as senior policy advisor for Native American Affairs

Categorías: Varios en ingles, USA

WASHINGTON – In taped remarks to the 2009 National Congress of American Indians Mid-Year Conference June 15, President Barack Obama announced the appointment of Kimberly Teehee as senior policy advisor for Native American Affairs. As a member of the Domestic Policy Council, Teehee will advise the president on issues affecting Indian country. President Obama also announced that the White House will hold a Tribal Nations Conference later this fall.

“Kim Teehee will be a tremendous asset to our team as we work to strengthen and build on the nation-to-nation relationship between the United States and tribal nations,” President Obama said. “She is rightly recognized as an outstanding advocate for Indian country, and she will provide a direct interface at the highest level of my administration, assuring a voice for Native Americans during policy making decisions.”

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23.06.09

Global war against indigenous peoples: grabbing the last resources on Earth!

Categorías: Varios en ingles

The Guardian’s John Vidal recently wrote a welcome piece – ‘We are fighting for our lives and our dignity’ -  that connect some of the dots in the current end game for the Earth’s natural resources most of which are on indigenous land inhabited for thousands of years by people who care for it, worship and respect it. Transnational corporations drilling for oil, mining for minerals or cutting down all the trees and polluting the rivers – and so on – are competing to grab hold of the Earth’s last resources – and there really is not much left! (See also: UN expert puts forward measures to regulate ‘land grabbing’).

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14.06.09

Indigenous Peoples: 'We Are Fighting for Our Lives and Our Dignity'

Categorías: Peru, Varios en ingles
Etiquetas:

By John Vidal. Published on Saturday, June 13, 2009 by The Guardian/UK

Across the globe, as mining and oil firms race for dwindling resources, indigenous peoples are battling to defend their lands – often paying the ultimate price

It has been called the world's second "oil war", but the only similarity between Iraq and events in the jungles of northern Peru over the last few weeks has been the mismatch of force. On one side have been the police armed with automatic weapons, teargas, helicopter gunships and armoured cars. On the other are several thousand Awajun and Wambis Indians, many of them in war paint and armed with bows and arrows and spears.

Natives set up a road block at the entrance of the Amazonian town of Yurimaguas, northern Peru. "For thousands of years, we've run the Amazon forests," said Servando Puerta, one of the protest leaders. "This is genocide. They're killing us for defending our lives, our sovereignty, human dignity." (AFP/Ernesto Benavides)

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25.05.09

Special Rapporteur says Optimism for Indigenous Peoples' better furture animated by Positive Developments, but tempered by reality of Ongoing Struugles

Categorías: Varios en ingles

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
Eighth Session
5th Meeting (PM)

He Calls on Member States to Supply Information on Human Rights Violations Of Indigenous Persons, Endorse Declaration, Commit Aid for Governmental Reforms

As the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues continued its eighth annual session this afternoon, the United NationsSpecial Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples, James Anaya, shed light on his recent efforts to redress their grievances over the deeply-rooted disregard for their values and land rights by Governments and corporations.

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18.05.09

Opening Statement by the Participants at the Global Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus meeting

Categorías: Varios en ingles

United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues 8th Session
New York, May 18-29, 2009 Opening Statement by the Participants at the Global Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus meeting from May 16-17, 2009

Presented by Miki’ala Catalfano, Native Hawaiian, 7th Generation Fund Indigenous Peoples and Nations from all regions of the world who participated in the Global Indigenous Peoples Caucus meeting for the Permanent Forum 8th session reflected on a range of serious considerations and situations presented in our meeting.

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03.05.09

TAIWAN. Pingpu Aborigines heat up battle for ethnic identity

Categorías: Varios en ingles
Etiquetas:

A PEOPLE’S ROOTS: An ethnic reawakening of sorts for Plains Aborigines has long been hampered by policies from the central government that erased their origins

Thousands of Pingpu (平埔), or “Plains” Aborigines, rallied in front of the Presidential Office yesterday demanding that the government restore their Aboriginal status. With many dressed in traditional outfits and holding traditional instruments, they chanted slogans and sang as they marched from the Legislative Yuan to Ketagalan Boulevard.

Members of Plains Aborigines tribes rally in front of the Presidential Office yesterday demanding that the government restore their Aboriginal status.
PHOTO: LO PEI-DER, TAIPEI TIMES

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29.03.09

UN Special Rapporteur completes visit to Botswana

Categorías: Varios en ingles

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, Prof. S. James Anaya, concluded his nine-day visit to Botswana on Friday 27th.

Prof. Anaya was appointed by the Human Rights Council as a new Special Rapporteur for an initial period of 3 years. His visit to Botswana marked his first to Africa since his tenure in office on May 1 2008 and was undertaken at the invitation of the Government of Botswana.

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12.03.09

USA. Wizipan Garriott named Obama’s First Americans Public Liaison

Categorías: Varios en ingles

WASHINGTON – Wizipan Garriott, 28, has been appointed First Americans Public Liaison, a newly created position in President-elect Barack Obama’s transition team. The position is aimed at honoring a nation-to-nation relationship with tribes.

Amy Brundage, a spokeswoman for the team, confirmed Garriott’s role Dec. 10.

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04.03.09

ONU. Relator J. Anaya visitará Botswana

UN to probe Botswana on human rights
Botswana President's office said UN Special Rapporteur Prof Anaya will visit the country after being invited, to show that the southern African country is cooperative and receptive to the UN Human Rights Council's special procedures and mechanisms.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous People, Professor James Anaya is expected in Botswana in two weeks to conduct investigations.

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01.02.09

AUSTRALIA. Yes we can - No we can't

Categorías: Varios en ingles

29.01.2009. Barack Hussein Obama (b. August 4, 1961), the 44th President of the United States of America said in his inauguration address on 20 January 2009: "Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends — hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism — these things are old."

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AUSTRALIA. Could racial discrimination ruin the promise of a beautiful friendship?

01.02.2009. This year James Anaya, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on human rights and fundamental freedoms of Indigenous people, is planning a formal visit to Australia, during which he will examine the status of Indigenous peoples' human rights in Australia and Government responses such as the Northern Territory Emergency Response.

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05.01.09

Anaya: Nicaragua’s titling of communal lands marks major step for indigenous rights


By S. James Anaya

On a recent late morning in Nicaragua I landed in a Soviet-made helicopter (a remnant of the revolutionary Sandinistas’ 1980s past) in the remote community of Awas Tingni to witness a historic event, the handing over of the long sought after title to the community’s traditional territory, an area of some 74,000 hectares, or 285 square miles. For the first time ever Nicaragua would formally recognize that these lands belong to Awas Tingni, a Mayangna community of about 1,500 people and one of the many Mayangna, Miskito, and Rama communities that are indigenous to the country’s vast Atlantic Coast region. This day would be the culmination of a struggle that has been at forefront of efforts by indigenous peoples worldwide to reverse historical trends and regain control of ancestral lands and full respect for their human rights.

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05.12.08

NEPAL. Forum meeting for Representatives and members of Indigenous Communities Held

Forum meeting for representatives and members of Indigenous Communities was held on 25 November 2008 at Hotel Himalayan, Lalitpur on the arrival of Mr. James Anaya, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Indigenous Nationalities visit to Nepal (24th November- 2nd December 2008).

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UN expert urges action on Nepal's commitment to indigenous rights

KATHMANDU/GENEVA, Dec. 2, 2008 - "This is a critical moment to respond to the many challenges that indigenous peoples of Nepal face," said Professor S. James Anaya, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on indigenous peoples, as he concluded his nine-day visit to Nepal. "While I am encouraged by expressions of commitment by the Government of Nepal to advance the rights of indigenous peoples, much needs to be done."

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25.11.08

UN SRIP Prof. S. James Anaya listed the voices of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples in Kathmandu, Nepal

Categorías: Varios en ingles

National Network of Indigenous Women (NNIW) organized a Reception programme on the occasion of official visit of UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human c Fundamental Freedom of Indigenous Peoples in Kathmandu on 25th Nov. 2008 .

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22.11.08

Special Rapporteur on indigenous people visiting Nepal

Categorías: Varios en ingles

At the invitation of the Government, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, S. James Anaya, will visit Nepal from 24 November to 2 December.

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09.11.08

Whither Ecuador? An Interview with Indigenous Activist and Politician Monica Chuji

Categorías: Varios en ingles

Monica Chuji is an indigenous Kichwa activist from the Ecuadorian Amazon. She served as an Assembly Member from President Rafael Correa’s Alianza País party in the National Constituent Assembly, drafting Ecuador’s new constitution. Prior to Chuji’s election to the Assembly, she was Correa’s Secretary of Communication and spokeswoman. In September, she broke with Correa and left Alianza País, the culmination of months of increasing conflict between the President and Ecuador’s social and indigenous movements.

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