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14.06.10

EEUU. Web site for public comment on UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Categorías: Declaración ONU, EEUU, USA
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websiteWASHINGTON – Following up on the administration’s promise to review its position on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the State Department has created a new Web site to receive public input on the issue.


State Department’s Office of the Spokesman issued a press release June 4 announcing the new Web site outreach. The press release referred to an announcement by U.S. Permanent Representative Susan E. Rice of the federal government’s intention to review its position on the Declaration during the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York in April.


UNDRIP was adopted by the U.N. General Assembly Sept. 13, 2007, in a historic vote by an overwhelming majority of 143 states in favor to four against, with 11 abstentions. Canada, the U.S., Australia and New Zealand – all countries whose sizeable indigenous populations can claim large areas of land – were the only four states that voted no.

Since then, the Canadian Parliament – not the federal government – passed a resolution in April 2008, endorsing the Declaration, the Australian government adopted the Declaration in April 2009, and New Zealand announced its support for the indigenous human rights document on April 19 – the opening day of the Ninth Session of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Rice, accompanied by a 20-member U.S. delegation, attended the forum the day after New Zealand’s announcement and promised the review in a speech.

“I am pleased to announce that the United States has decided to review our position regarding the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,” Rice said.

“We recognize that, for many around the world, this Declaration provides a framework for addressing indigenous issues. During President Obama’s first year in office, tribal leaders encouraged the United States to re-examine its position on the Declaration – an important recommendation that directly complements our commitment to work together with the international community on the many challenges that indigenous peoples face.”

The State Department press release says that as part of the U.S. government’s review, the department, along with other federal agencies, “will be hosting consultations with federally recognized tribes and dialogues with interested NGOs and other stakeholders” as part of the government’s re-examination of the Declaration.

It is not clear if the State Department has completed a formal tribal consultation plan, as required by President Obama’s memorandum to department and agency heads during the first White House Tribal Leaders Summit last November. According to the memorandum, departments and agencies were to complete the formal consultation plans within 90 days.

The State Department will post consultation and meeting schedules online at

http://www.state.gov/s/tribalconsultation/declaration/index.htm


Tribal leaders, non-governmental organizations and others who may not be able to attend consultation meetings are encouraged to participate in the review by e-mailing comments to Declaration@state.gov, or by submitting comments via mail to the Department of State at: S/SR Global Intergovernmental Affairs, U.S. Department of State, 2201 C Street N.W., Suite 1317, Washington, D.C. 20520.

“Written comments are requested by July 15, 2010 to ensure that they can be given due consideration in the review,” the department said.

 

By Gale Courey Toensing

Story Published: Jun 14, 2010


SOURCE
http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/national/96138574.html

 

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WELCOME to the Department of State’s website for the U.S. review of its position on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The Administration recognizes that for many around the world, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides a framework for addressing indigenous issues. Tribal leaders and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have recommended that the United States reexamine its position on the Declaration. In response, the Department of State and other Federal agencies will be conducting a review of the Declaration’s provisions.

Consultations with Federally Recognized Indian Tribes and Outreach to Interested NGOs

The U.S. Government looks forward to hearing from all interested parties as it undertakes its review of the Declaration. The U.S. Department of State, together with other Federal agencies, will be holding consultations with federally recognized Indian tribes and meetings with interested nongovernmental organizations and other stakeholders on the review of the Declaration. Exact dates and locations will be announced on this website. Anyone unable to participate in these consultations or meetings in person can send comments by email to declaration@state.gov or by mail to S/SR Global Intergovernmental Affairs, U.S. Department of State, 2201 C Street NW., Suite 1317, Washington, DC 20520. Please send written comments by July 15, 2010 to ensure that they can be given due consideration in the review.

The Department of State will update this site with announcements about the review of the UN Declaration.

 


 

Documento relacionado

EEUU. Letter to Tribal Leaders. Letter to Tribal Leaders Hillary Rodham Clinton Secretary of State

 

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